Summer 2016 Week 14 (Sept 13)

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Small: broccoli, lacinto kale, collards, honeydew, arugula, cantaloupe, red kale, romain lettuce, cucumber, carrots, lemon cucumber, golden beet, pattypan squash, jalapeño, tomatoes

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Medium add: lettuce, swiss chard, arugula, broccoli, japanese eggplant, armenian cucumber.

For a simple meal with a friend I just made this carrot soup and roasted beets over a bed of arugula.  The arugula can simply be tossed with lemon juice, olive oil, and sea salt or balsamic vinegar.  This is another similar soup that also uses the collard greens in our box.  Last week I managed to use 4 bunches of kale in 2 days, one with a gratin and another with another favorite soup.  These big zucchinis are perfect for breading and serving plain or with some tomato sauce.

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Summer Week 13 (Sept. 6)

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Small: Green pattypan squash, summer squash, broccoli, flying sauce pattypan squash, arugula, spinach, collard greens, romain lettuce, cantaloupe, purple kale, lacinto kale, cherry tomatoes, multi-color carrots, beets

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Medium add: Curly leaf kale, broccoli, spinach, swiss chard, baby bak choi, san marzano tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, early white pattypan squash, peppers, cantaloupe

Has anyone tried stuffed pattypan squash?  Here’s a quick an easy meal to use kale. Or soup that you can add carrot, tomato, and squash too.

Summer 2015 Week 14 (Sept 15th)

Heavy boxes today! In my 5 years of Zoe’s this was the most fruit in one share ever. I’m sure you’ll have no trouble working through peaches, apples, and berries. It has been a strange year, strawberries and rhubarb lasting through the summer and apples being ready early. It was probably also a matter of saving some things from this heavy rain and cooler temperatures. I opened my box right after delivery this morning and the tomatoes were quite cold. I would go ahead and roast the big tomatoes for a sauce rather than slicing raw. I made this recipe for braised greens in tomato sauce over polenta last week and my husband didn’t even ask “where’s the meat?”

caption id=”attachment_1961″ align=”alignleft” width=”640″]Small: Heirloom cherry tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, tomatoes, peaches, apples, romaine, broccolini, rhubarb, and a patty pan squash. Small: Heirloom cherry tomatoes, raspberries, strawberries, tomatoes, peaches, apples, romaine, broccoli, rhubarb, and a patty pan squash.[/caption]

Medium Add:  Blackberries, zucchini, cucumber, broccolini, lacinto kale, and swiss chard.
Medium Add: Blackberries, zucchini, cucumber, broccolini, lacinto kale, and swiss chard.

Spring 2013 Week 10 (May 28th)

Crazy day yesterday. Apologies to anyone affected by the flat tire halfway through the delivery day. This is our last week of the spring season, and then we have two weeks off to get ready for the summer shares. Please sign up if you’ve been happy so far. Consider going for a larger share and splitting it with a neighbor / relative. I promise the variety only increases. We’ll see less of the greens (though many varieties of lettuce will probably make lots of appearances early on), and much more of the summer-y vegetables. Last season, in these weeks, we saw summer squash, cucumbers, peppers, chard, berries, peaches, tomatoes, broccoli, kale, apples, melons, beets, sorrel, kohlrabi, turnips, choy, baby carrots, fennel, amaranth greens, purslane, artichoke, arugula, lettuce, peas, goji berry greens, basil, collards, apricots, cherries, garlic, scapes, mustard greens, turnip greens, rhubarb, dandelion, and strawberries.

This week’s share:

garlic
onion
shallot
turnip
asparagus
rutabaga
radishes
parsnips
spinach
kale
lettuce (best for braising)
chard (I ended up with collards due to a counting issue, ignore picture caption)
mixed baby greens
goji berry greens

The goji berry greens are new. Remove the leaves from the stems. They can be used in salads, soups, most places you’d put spinach, and also in tea. They’re rich in anti-oxidants and vitamins.

The lettuce, thanks to the really warm weather following quickly on really cool weather, is a little too tough for salads. David called it “braising lettuce”. Give it a very short saute with some olive oil and a few tablespoons of stock (or salt, pepper, and water) and serve as a side dish or under some grilled fish.

TOP: garlic, onion, shallot, turnip, asparagus, rutabaga, radishes, parsnips;  MID: spinach, kale, lettuce, collards, mixed baby greens;  BOT: goji berry greens
TOP: garlic, onion, shallot, turnip, asparagus, rutabaga, radishes, parsnips; MID: spinach, kale, lettuce, collards, mixed baby greens; BOT: goji berry greens

Spring 2013 Week 6 (April 30th)

David and I were too busy to talk yesterday, so while I have the medium share list (on account of receiving it), I’m not sure what the breakdown is on medium vs small. Here is a picture of what I received with labels so you can identify yours.

mustard greens
kale
kohlrabi
green asparagus
purple asparagus (probably just medium)
spinach
chard
collard greens
fingerling potatoes
shallots
onions

TOP: mustard greens, kale  MIDDLE: kohlrabi, green and purple asparagus, spinach, chard, collards  BOTTOM: potatoes, shallots, onions
TOP: mustard greens, kale MIDDLE: kohlrabi, green and purple asparagus, spinach, chard, collards BOTTOM: potatoes, shallots, onions

As a for instance on using the share, last night I cooked: roasted potatoes, onions, and asparagus (and diced bacon); boiled chard with a sesame-soy dressing; cube steaks; and a spinach salad. All of these will just be small side dishes through the week.

Spring 2013 Week 4 (April 16th) PLUS recipes

Pictures will follow later tonight, but here are the share lists (and a few recipes) for today:

SMALL
kohlrabi
baby turnips
baby rutabaga
collard greens
chard
asparagus
fingerling potatoes
parsnip
onion
spinach
roasted peppers (frozen)

MEDIUM
sorrel (aka lemon spinach)
mixed salad greens
extra chard
extra collards
extra baby turnips
extra baby rutabaga

A note on sorrel: This very “bright” green looks like pointy spinach, but it doesn’t taste like it. It is quite sour, but adds a nice flavor to salads, soups, and pestos. Store as you would spinach, loosely wrapped in a plastic bag with a paper towel added to keep it from wilting. Also see here for recommendations.

Root Veg Mash with caramelized onions
This will use four or five ingredients from the share today. Peel and cube the rutabaga and parsnips, and just cube the potatoes (unless you aren’t a fan of skins). You could add the turnips if you’d like. Boil the roots in salted water until tender enough to mash. In the meantime, saute a sliced onion and some minced garlic until the onions begin to brown. Drain the root cubes and mash with a bit of stock or cream, seasoned with thyme, salt, and pepper. Stir in the onions and serve.

Places to put collards, chard, and spinach
There are a lot of ideas for using up our greens here, from simply boiling them and serving, to sauteeing with garlic and putting over pasta. Sometimes I serve them as a side dish by themselves, but at least half the time I just slip them into other dishes. They pair well with eggs, so put ribbons of them into quiche, omelets, or frittata. I put one whole bunch of collards into a savory bread pudding with sausage this week (think stuffing as a main dish). I put them into soups quite a bit, especially chicken, vegetable, and minestrone style soups. Potato soups are good with crunchier kale and collards.

Week 2 Followup

LtoR: mixed greens, spinach, wheat grass, microgreens and flowers
LtoR: mixed greens, spinach, wheat grass, microgreens and flowers
Top: kohlrabi, Bot: Mustard
Top: kohlrabi, Bot: Mustard
LtoR: Chard, kale, collards
LtoR: Chard, kale, collards
LtoR: Parsnip, beet, rutabaga, onion, potatoes
LtoR: Parsnip, beet, rutabaga, onion, potatoes

A few ideas on storage and cooking:

Kohlrabi — they look like sputnik, but they taste like a cross between cabbage and turnips. Take off the leaves if you’re going to save them for a few days. Peel the hard outer skin before using in a recipe — they’re good sliced raw into a salad or roasted with root veggies, added to soups or sauteed in butter on their own.

Rutabaga — Will keep in the crisper very well. Try smaller ones raw with sliced cheese, or add to a mash with your potatoes.

Mustard and Collards — the bitter greens can be a bit intimidating, but they’re extremely good for you. They look like a huge volume, but they shrink a lot when cooked. Fat and acid will cut the bitterness if your family isn’t a fan of the strong tastes. Tonight I used up two bunches of mustard greens in a simple side dish for rice and curried chicken. Simmer one can coconut milk, garlic, a bit of stock, salt, and pepper with shredded mustard greens until tender, about 20 minutes.