Extended Winter 2017 (March 14th)

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Parsnips, shallot, garlic, onion, spinach, arugula, mustard greens, miniature romain, broccolini, daikon radish, carrot, brussels sprouts, turnip, beets, purple cabbage.

Anyone else excited for beets?  I’ll be roasting those right away and putting them on a bed of arugula and sprinkling with chevre and balsamic vinegar. May as well roast the carrots, parsnips, turnips, and brussles on the same baking sheet. Here are some turnip ideas, many of which use other veggies from our box too. I have a hard time with mustard greens, but this simple recipe looks hopeful; vinegar in the mustard can cut the bitterness of the greens.

Winter 2016-2017 Week 5 (Jan 3rd)

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Swiss chard, salad mix, arugula, spinach, collard greens, broccolini, green leaf and miniature romain lettuce, carrots, honeycomb, fuji apples, white potatoes, shallot, yellow onion, garlic.

 

I was excited to see the collards to make this soup. Rather than a salad this arugula pesto looks good. We got the perfect amount of chard and potatoes to make a frittata like this.

Summer 2016 Week 14 (Sept 13)

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Small: broccoli, lacinto kale, collards, honeydew, arugula, cantaloupe, red kale, romain lettuce, cucumber, carrots, lemon cucumber, golden beet, pattypan squash, jalapeño, tomatoes

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Medium add: lettuce, swiss chard, arugula, broccoli, japanese eggplant, armenian cucumber.

For a simple meal with a friend I just made this carrot soup and roasted beets over a bed of arugula.  The arugula can simply be tossed with lemon juice, olive oil, and sea salt or balsamic vinegar.  This is another similar soup that also uses the collard greens in our box.  Last week I managed to use 4 bunches of kale in 2 days, one with a gratin and another with another favorite soup.  These big zucchinis are perfect for breading and serving plain or with some tomato sauce.

Pesto, generic

Pesto, which most of us know as a saucy mix of basil, garlic, and oil, tossed with pasta, is actually a generic term for things made by pounding.  It is traditionally made with a mortar and pestle, at least in Italy.  It is far easier in a food processor or blender.  Pesto is an incredibly versatile vehicle for using up produce at the height of freshness.  I’ll give you a generic basil recipe with some rough proportions, but it can be adjusted to taste with a free hand and ingredients are limited only by your imagination.  Basically, you need something bright and fresh, something nutty, something salty, and something oily.  (And as a side note, you’re not far off from hummus with this recipe, which also has infinite variations involving beans and seasoning.)

Generic Basil Pesto

3-4 cloves garlic, peeled
1/2 cup toasted pine nuts
2 cups washed and dried basil
salt and pepper
1/4-1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup grated hard cheese (pecorino romano, parmesan, italic)

Chop the garlic and pine nuts in the food processor.  Add the basil and pulse until a thick paste forms.  Season and add the oil while the food processor runs.  If you are making a dip or spread, add less oil.  If you’re tossing it with pasta, add a little more.  Lastly, stir in the cheese.  This will keep a week in the fridge (longer in the freezer) if you put a thin layer of olive oil on top to seal it in.

Alternatives:
– try cilantro, parsley, sorrel, spinach, or arugula as a partial or full substitute for the basil
– create a red pesto from sun dried tomatoes or roasted red peppers
– try almonds, cashews, walnuts, or beans as substitutes for the pine nuts
– cilantro, garlic, edamame beans, a little ginger, and a little sesame oil to replace some of the olive oil (cheese isn’t necessary for this one)
– cilantro, garlic, chipotle chile, and pepitas (pumpkin seeds) — fantastic in tacos, especially with a little tomatillo included
– scapes (coming soon), green garlic or green onions in place of most of the basil and garlic