Extended Winter 2017 (March 14th)

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Parsnips, shallot, garlic, onion, spinach, arugula, mustard greens, miniature romain, broccolini, daikon radish, carrot, brussels sprouts, turnip, beets, purple cabbage.

Anyone else excited for beets?  I’ll be roasting those right away and putting them on a bed of arugula and sprinkling with chevre and balsamic vinegar. May as well roast the carrots, parsnips, turnips, and brussles on the same baking sheet. Here are some turnip ideas, many of which use other veggies from our box too. I have a hard time with mustard greens, but this simple recipe looks hopeful; vinegar in the mustard can cut the bitterness of the greens.

Winter 2016-2017 Week 1 (Dec 6)

Hello Winter members! Every winter David just offers a small box and forgot, so those of us that normally get a medium got one for the price of a small. The green leaf lettuce is a more tender break from the usual romain. I’m going to let the oven do the work for a meal this week and roast parsnips, brussels, and beets on one baking sheet. Here’s my favorite thing to do with green cabbage again, since blog posts back to March were lost. Here are 3 ideas for black radishes.

 

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Small: parsnips, spinach, curly leaf kale, broccolini, green cabbage, yellow onion, shallot, daikon radish, black Spanish radish, watermelon radish, Korean giant Asian Pear, green leaf lettuce, , brussels sprouts, beets, and honey comb.

Of Beets and Cabbage

On a tip from the manager of our business side, Helena, I visited a site called Natasha’s Kitchen. She specializes in Ukrainian and Russian cooking. And Russia and our winter CSA shares have something in common — cabbage and beets hold up well in the cold. Here are the highlight recipes (for my tastes) I found on her site. Check them out and enjoy.

http://natashaskitchen.com/2012/11/25/moms-creamy-beet-salad-recipe/
I think this one could be made with raw beets if you were inclined, or beets that you matchstick and then nuke gently just to take the edge off. Also, top with the microgreens. The sweet and the sharp go well together.

http://natashaskitchen.com/2012/03/16/borscht-recipe-ii/
The faster of her two borscht recipes. Uses both cabbage AND beets AND onion AND potatoes.

http://natashaskitchen.com/2010/06/21/russian-vinaigrette-recipe-with-beets-and-sauerkraut/
I like fermented and pickled things, so this sounds great to me.

http://arbuz.com/recipes/pickled-cabbage-recipe
And while a good sauerkraut is fantastic, I went and found a recipe for Russian pickled cabbage for the adventurous. It does take three days to ferment, but this is faster than making sauerkraut. As I currently have kombucha, ginger beer, and mead all fermenting in my cupboard, I don’t think I’m allowed any more real estate — let us know how it compares if you try it.

A, B, C’s – Artichokes, Beets, and Cherries

I so rarely eat artichokes that aren’t hearts in a jar that I always have to look up what to do with them. So rather than pretend to know what I’m talking about, I’m going to link you all to a very good visual instruction guide!

From SimplyRecipes.com

Beets, I know something about. Scrub the beets very well, trim off most of the stems (leave less than an inch), and the little tail if it is bugging you. Wrap them individually in foil. Pop them in the oven at 400 degrees for an hour (small ones) to an hour and a half. Remove, cool, unwrap, and slip the skins right off. They are delicious as is, or dice them up with butter and salt, or put into your favorite recipes. This is the least-stainy way to deal with them, but don’t do any step in the process in a favorite shirt (or on your unspoilt new wooden cutting board).

Cherries. I challenge you to not just eat them all. I just needed a C. However, they make a really great combo with the apricots that come into season at the same time. Or make a cherry salsa to top meat or grilled veggies. 1 part diced red onions left to sit with a squeeze of lemon juice to take the edge off, 3 parts pitted and chopped cherries, basil to taste. You can just chop it all and combine, or you can throw it through the food processor. Surprisingly delightful.

Borscht

Dinner tonight.  Hearty, warm, and uses lots of fresh farm ingredients.

Borscht (Russian cabbage and beet soup)

knob of butter, bacon grease, or double glug of olive oil
1-1/2 cups chopped onion
1 large, sliced carrot
1 stalk chopped celery
1 tsp caraway seeds
3 cups chopped cabbage
4 cups of stock
1 1/2 cups thinly sliced potatoes
1 1/2 cups thinly sliced beets (peeled)
1 can (or cup) of diced tomatoes
salt & pepper to taste
1 Tbs sour cream per serving
a pinch of dill per serving

In a large, heavy bottomed pot, saute your onions, carrots, and celery until the onions are starting to soften.  Add caraway seeds for a couple of minutes, then the cabbage for a couple of more.  Add stock, potatoes, beets, and tomatoes, and boil for about 30 minutes.  Season to taste, and serve with a dollop of sour cream and a pinch of dill.  Probably best with a heavy rye loaf.

A couple of recipes

Here’s a recipe that uses kohlrabi AND summer squash that I found on the Straight from the Farm blog.  Visit their site — they have good pictures of filling the empanadas.

Kohlrabi & Squash Empanadas
3 cloves of garlic, finely minced
1 inch of ginger, peeled and grated
2 medium kohlrabies, peeled and cut into small cubes
1 large summer squash, cut into small cubes
2 large scallions, both white and green parts, finely cut
1 radish, minced (optional)
1 T. extra virgin olive oil
1 T. butter
salt and pepper to taste
dash of freshly grated nutmeg
1 box of pre-made pie crust or one batch homemade*
1 egg

In a medium skillet, heat oil and butter over medium heat.  Add garlic and ginger to brown.  Add kohlrabi cubes, a pinch of salt and some pepper. Toss well and cook 3 or 4 minutes until kohlrabi are softening a bit.  Add squash cubes and continue to cook for 4 more minutes.  Add scallions, radish, nutmeg and another pinch of salt and pepper.  Mix well and cook for one minute before removing from heat.  Set mixture to this side to cool.

Roll out dough to be a little thinner than pie crust typically is.  If you are using pre-made crust from the store, run your rolling pin over it once or twice.   Using a cereal bowl or large circular cookie cutter, cut out 6 inch-ish circles from the dough.  It should yield about 15, give or take depending on your cutter and dough thickness.

Pre-heat oven to 425F and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.   Prepare egg wash by beating egg with a teaspoon of water and set to the side along with a small bowl of water.

To make the empanadas, spoon one tablespoon of kohlrabi and squash mixture into the center of a circle of dough.   (It’s better to have less filling than too much or the empanadas won’t hold together. Feel out the right ratio that allows you to close off the dough without any filling popping out.)   Dip your finger in the bowl of water and run it around the outside edge of the dough.  Fold dough over the filling to create a half circle.  Press down edges.  Carefully pick up the dough pocket and pinch edges (see photo) to seal them tightly.  A fork can also be used to crimp the edges if you want a less tedious method.

Repeat above process to finish all the empanadas, laying them on the lined cookie sheet when done.  With a fork, prick the tops once and brush with egg wash.   Bake for 8 minutes and turn over.  Bake another 5 to 7 minutes until deep golden brown and flaky.  Best served straight from the oven.

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In case you’ve been throwing your beets and cabbage into the bottom drawer and forgetting about them, I harvested these from Simply Recipes:

Beet Hummus – you can use up our cucumbers dipping in it

Roasted beets with balsamic and orange zest glaze – side dish

Colcannon – Irish mashed potato and cabbage dish

Italian sausage and cabbage stew – cabbage stew doesn’t sound super appetizing, but the recipe sounds pretty tasty