Kohlrabi and Apple Saute

kohlrabiI mention this recipe in passing pretty often, so I think I should put up an official version of it to link to.  This is dead simple while bringing a very pleasant and different flavor to the table.  The sweet and mild flavor makes a good foil for strong flavor like greens and sausage.  It can also be scaled because it is so loosey-goosey.  Keep the ratio of kohlrabi to apples at about 2:1, add more oil and seasoning as needed.

Kohlrabi and Apple Saute

2 kohlrabi
1 apple
oil (butter is best, olive or coconut are close seconds)
a bit of salt and pepper

Peel the kohlrabi and apple.  Slice them into the shapes that you find pleasing.  I tend to half them, (core the apples), then slice into 1/4″ slices.  Melt the butter in the skillet on medium heat.  Toss in the slices, season lightly, and stir occasionally until tender (about 10 minutes tops).

Turnips, Kohlrabi, and Peas

Ragout of Turnips, Kohlrabi, and Peas

Here is a great way to use at least three ingredients from the shares this week.  It is a little hot for soupy things, but this would be good not-piping-hot as well.

1 Tbsp Butter
6 green onions, halved (or diced scapes, if yours are still good)
4-6 smallish turnips, scrubbed and quartered
2 or 3 small kohlrabi, peeled and quartered
1 tsp thyme
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 pound pea pods, shelled (about half of our snap peas are big enough to shell, or simply dice the more tender snap pea shells into pea sized pieces)
a few handfuls shredded chard (or baby spinach)
dollop Mexican crema (or creme fraiche or sour cream)
4 large basil leaves, slivered

1. Melt the butter in a skillet and add the onions, turnips, kohlrabi, and thyme. Add water to cover halfway and a teaspoon of salt. Simmer while you shuck the peas.

2. When the vegetables are tender (12-15 minutes), add the peas and chard and cook until the spinach has wilted down, a few minutes more. (Add the peas at the 10 minute mark if you’re using the pods, too — they take a little longer to cook). Stir in the crema and add the basil. Taste for salt and season with pepper. Serve as a side or main dish, with some crusty bread or even over robust pasta.

Adapted to this week’s share from Local Flavors, by Deborah Madison.  I recommend the book as it focuses on using ingredients from farmer’s markets when they’re in season.  If they’re ripe at the same time, they’re probably in the same recipes.

The crisper overfloweth

I understand we’ve received three weeks in a row of certain vegetables.  Some of them (maybe collards?) are things with strong smells or unfamiliar flavors.  Others are just coming in volume, week after week.  This passes, as the summer heat causes things to bolt, mature, and wither, and so we just learn to love them in their season — too soon they will be gone.

This week, I’m going to cheat a bit and direct you to a college friend’s farm blog in Virginia.  Lisa of Frog Bottom Farm has a great rundown on collards, and I challenge you to try a couple of her ideas.  I think the turnip greens, and probably the mustard, would substitute well for all but the longest cooking methods.

I’m going to cheat again by directing you to a Mark Bittman article on slaw salads in the New York Times from 2011.  The recipe of interest for what is probably building up in your fridge is the Kohlrabi-Sesame Slaw, but as we head towards summer we should also see Asian radishes, lots of choy-type cabbages, and a few beets that overwintered and are growing again.  A little chopping (OK, a lot) on delivery day and you have a side salad that only improves in flavor all week.

Another item you’re going to be inundated with, if you don’t use several stalks a day with your greens, is young garlic.  They’re basically the garlicky version of green onions — not as strong as garlic, but stronger than scallions.  Use them as a cross between the two, and you’re set for soups, sautees, stir-fries, and sauces.  Add them to your simple skillet greens, your omelets, your asparagus, and your pilafs / fried rices.  Replace the basil in pesto and you can use up a large amount of them all at once, and this can be frozen or keep in the fridge for many weeks.

Lastly, and maybe most importantly, I will repost a favored link on the blanching and freezing of greens (almost everything except lettuce).  Piles of mustard building up?  Spinach you can’t use this week?  They’ll keep in the freezer, and you can add them to soups or serve as pot greens (with ham and potatoes?) later in the summer without any loss of quality.

Have you eaten it all yet?

This week’s share start tomorrow! Have you used up last week’s yet? Don’t worry, neither have I. So, what can we do with all that leftover produce? Some things keep well until more of them show up. Parsnips, collards, radishes, kohlrabi.  Time to get the rest used up!

Here are a few ways I cooked with my share this week:

– Salad greens and microgreens — the first half of the week was a salad a day for lunch. But that one is easy.

– Spinach — I stuck it into soups, omelets, and salads.

– Asparagus — We ate all of it in one meal. Sauteed with bacon and garlic, served with a béchamel sauce (brown a little flour in a stick of butter, then slowly stir in two cups of milk until a thick sauce forms). Not the healthiest meal this week, but tasty!

– Mustard greens and chard — I have eaten easy sauteed or braised greens almost every day this week. Sometimes I use bacon or sausage for flavor, but last night was just greens with ginger and garlic, splashed with lemon juice.

– Kohlrabi — It tastes like a cross between turnips and cabbage, but milder and quite pleasant. Try peeling it, slicing it, and sautéing with a sliced apple in butter (with a pinch of salt). Makes a slightly sweet side to more strongly flavored greens.

– Radishes and turnips — Eaten raw, as snacks with cheese and olives.

– Kale — This kale is crunchy, but it gets tender if you let it rest tossed with some olive oil and salt. Salad for tomorrow lunch.

A couple of recipes

Here’s a recipe that uses kohlrabi AND summer squash that I found on the Straight from the Farm blog.  Visit their site — they have good pictures of filling the empanadas.

Kohlrabi & Squash Empanadas
3 cloves of garlic, finely minced
1 inch of ginger, peeled and grated
2 medium kohlrabies, peeled and cut into small cubes
1 large summer squash, cut into small cubes
2 large scallions, both white and green parts, finely cut
1 radish, minced (optional)
1 T. extra virgin olive oil
1 T. butter
salt and pepper to taste
dash of freshly grated nutmeg
1 box of pre-made pie crust or one batch homemade*
1 egg

In a medium skillet, heat oil and butter over medium heat.  Add garlic and ginger to brown.  Add kohlrabi cubes, a pinch of salt and some pepper. Toss well and cook 3 or 4 minutes until kohlrabi are softening a bit.  Add squash cubes and continue to cook for 4 more minutes.  Add scallions, radish, nutmeg and another pinch of salt and pepper.  Mix well and cook for one minute before removing from heat.  Set mixture to this side to cool.

Roll out dough to be a little thinner than pie crust typically is.  If you are using pre-made crust from the store, run your rolling pin over it once or twice.   Using a cereal bowl or large circular cookie cutter, cut out 6 inch-ish circles from the dough.  It should yield about 15, give or take depending on your cutter and dough thickness.

Pre-heat oven to 425F and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.   Prepare egg wash by beating egg with a teaspoon of water and set to the side along with a small bowl of water.

To make the empanadas, spoon one tablespoon of kohlrabi and squash mixture into the center of a circle of dough.   (It’s better to have less filling than too much or the empanadas won’t hold together. Feel out the right ratio that allows you to close off the dough without any filling popping out.)   Dip your finger in the bowl of water and run it around the outside edge of the dough.  Fold dough over the filling to create a half circle.  Press down edges.  Carefully pick up the dough pocket and pinch edges (see photo) to seal them tightly.  A fork can also be used to crimp the edges if you want a less tedious method.

Repeat above process to finish all the empanadas, laying them on the lined cookie sheet when done.  With a fork, prick the tops once and brush with egg wash.   Bake for 8 minutes and turn over.  Bake another 5 to 7 minutes until deep golden brown and flaky.  Best served straight from the oven.

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In case you’ve been throwing your beets and cabbage into the bottom drawer and forgetting about them, I harvested these from Simply Recipes:

Beet Hummus – you can use up our cucumbers dipping in it

Roasted beets with balsamic and orange zest glaze – side dish

Colcannon – Irish mashed potato and cabbage dish

Italian sausage and cabbage stew – cabbage stew doesn’t sound super appetizing, but the recipe sounds pretty tasty

Miscellaneous Produce

Here’s a few ideas I put together this week to use up multiple share items at once.  Some of them are small helpings, so they work well mixed with other ingredients as opposed to alone.

A pesto/hummus made from fava beans, microgreens (or basil from the farmer’s market), scapes, and olive oil.
A super salad made from lettuce, microgreens, sliced kohlrabi, and roasted beets.
Three sisters made from favas, summer squash, and corn (frozen, canned, or from the market scraped off the cob).
A One skillet meal made from cabbage, summer squash, and meat (ground beef or lamb).  Easily wrapped in tortillas or served over rice.
A colorful soup made from green beans, leeks, a winter squash or sweet potatoes, and seasoned to taste.

Kohlrabi Dishes

Kohlrabi Puree:

from the blog Foodie Farm Girl

Note: You can leave the mushrooms out if you don’t have them handy.

Ingredients:
4 kohlrabi bulbs with leaves
2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
4 ounces cultivated mushrooms (I used Baby Bellas), quartered
3 Tablespoons cream (or milk, chicken stock, olive oil, or water)
salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
1. Trim the kohlrabi bulbs, peeling them if the skins seem tough. Rinse the leaves (discarding any that are yellow) pat them dry, and coarsely chop. Set aside. But the bulbs into 1-inch chunks.
2. Bring a saucepan of lightly salted water to a boil, and add the kohlrabi chunks. Reduce the heat and simmer until tender, about 15 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a skillet. Add the onion and sauté over medium-low heat until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, another 1 to 2 minutes. Do not let garlic brown.
4. Add the mushrooms and the reserved kohlrabi leaves to the skillet. Cover, and cook 5 minutes. Then uncover, and cook, stirring, until all the liquid has evaporated, 3 minutes. Set the skillet aside.
5. Drain the kohlrabi chunks and place them in the bowl of a food processor. Add the mushroom mixture and all the remaining ingredients. Purée until smooth.
6. Transfer the purée to a saucepan and reheat over low heat, stirring, 2 minutes.

Roasted Kohlrabi
from the All Recipes Website

Ingredients:
4 kohlrabi bulbs, peeled
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
salt and pepper to taste
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions:
Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
Cut the kohlrabi into 1/4 inch thick slices, then cut each of the slices in half. Combine olive oil, garlic, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Toss kohlrabi slices in the olive oil mixture to coat. Spread kohlrabi in a single layer on a baking sheet.
Bake in the preheated oven until browned, 15 to 20 minutes, stirring occasionally in order to brown evenly. Remove from oven and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Return to the oven to allow the Parmesan cheese to brown, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately.

Thanks to Alissa for sharing. Let me know what you think of these recipes or tell me ways you’ve prepared your kohlrabi.

Jessica