Fall 2017 Week 1 (Oct. 3rd)

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Small- Kale, spinach, radishes, salad mix, arugula, honeydew, mint, baby mustard greens, green cabbage, swiss chard, broccolini, miniature romain, poblano and anaheim peppers, cherry tomatoes, pattypan squash, onion.

 

Hello Fall members!  For the poblanos and anaheim I will make chili verde by blackening the peppers under broiler, letting them steam in a paper bag, peeling, seeding, and chopping into 1/4 inch squares.  This I add to a roux and add broth for a flavorful gravy.  For texture/protein add cubed, browned pork chops or hominy and chickpeas. My husband’s New Mexican family eats this with beans and tortillas. This white bean chili also looks good. I recently learned the best way to cook cabbage from some Brazilian friends.  Shred thin (1/8th inch) and cook on medium low with butter and salt.  Try a salad or drink with the melon and mint.  This salad looks like a filling, healthy way to use arugula and cherry tomatoes. And here’s a one-pot dinner that would be perfect with our baby mustard greens.

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Extended Winter Week 7 (March 21st)

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Daikon radish, spinach, granny smith apples, purple cabbage, carrots, miniature romain, mustard greens, swiss chard, brussels sprouts, potatoes, turnips, garlic, shallot, onion.

 

Just enough apples for a pie! I’ve been making this one lately. And luckily I mentioned my mustard green phobia last week, a member gave a great method that I’ve never heard.  Much like with spicy radishes, you salt the leaves (you can cut them first) and let them sit for half an hour, rinse, and squeeze as dry as possible before stir frying with garlic, chilis, ground pork and adding a little sugar and salt.

Extended Winter 2017 (March 14th)

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Parsnips, shallot, garlic, onion, spinach, arugula, mustard greens, miniature romain, broccolini, daikon radish, carrot, brussels sprouts, turnip, beets, purple cabbage.

Anyone else excited for beets?  I’ll be roasting those right away and putting them on a bed of arugula and sprinkling with chevre and balsamic vinegar. May as well roast the carrots, parsnips, turnips, and brussles on the same baking sheet. Here are some turnip ideas, many of which use other veggies from our box too. I have a hard time with mustard greens, but this simple recipe looks hopeful; vinegar in the mustard can cut the bitterness of the greens.

Winter 2016-17 Week 8 (Jan 24)

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Mustard greens, miniature romain, brussels sprouts, carrots, spinach, broccolini, butternut squash, cabbage, red onion, garlic, fuji apples, daikon radish, pea shoots.

 

Beans and Greens would be a good way to use spinach or the mustard greens, traditionally you would add slices of sausage too.  This springy salad topped with salmon, lentils, and our pea shoots looks amazing. You could roast brussels on a sheet pan along with peeled, chopped butternut squash or shave for a salad with apple too.  And I think stir fried cabbage will work well for Chinese New Year on Saturday.

Next week is the last share for the winter season. Thanks for joining us! Sign up for Extended Winter starting February here.

The crisper overfloweth

I understand we’ve received three weeks in a row of certain vegetables.  Some of them (maybe collards?) are things with strong smells or unfamiliar flavors.  Others are just coming in volume, week after week.  This passes, as the summer heat causes things to bolt, mature, and wither, and so we just learn to love them in their season — too soon they will be gone.

This week, I’m going to cheat a bit and direct you to a college friend’s farm blog in Virginia.  Lisa of Frog Bottom Farm has a great rundown on collards, and I challenge you to try a couple of her ideas.  I think the turnip greens, and probably the mustard, would substitute well for all but the longest cooking methods.

I’m going to cheat again by directing you to a Mark Bittman article on slaw salads in the New York Times from 2011.  The recipe of interest for what is probably building up in your fridge is the Kohlrabi-Sesame Slaw, but as we head towards summer we should also see Asian radishes, lots of choy-type cabbages, and a few beets that overwintered and are growing again.  A little chopping (OK, a lot) on delivery day and you have a side salad that only improves in flavor all week.

Another item you’re going to be inundated with, if you don’t use several stalks a day with your greens, is young garlic.  They’re basically the garlicky version of green onions — not as strong as garlic, but stronger than scallions.  Use them as a cross between the two, and you’re set for soups, sautees, stir-fries, and sauces.  Add them to your simple skillet greens, your omelets, your asparagus, and your pilafs / fried rices.  Replace the basil in pesto and you can use up a large amount of them all at once, and this can be frozen or keep in the fridge for many weeks.

Lastly, and maybe most importantly, I will repost a favored link on the blanching and freezing of greens (almost everything except lettuce).  Piles of mustard building up?  Spinach you can’t use this week?  They’ll keep in the freezer, and you can add them to soups or serve as pot greens (with ham and potatoes?) later in the summer without any loss of quality.