What we grow

A note on produce and how it is delivered.  The farm team does quite a bit to clean it up if at all possible, but there isn’t always time.  Also, many of these plants keep better if they’re a little dirty — storing them with water on the leaves tends to lead to freezing or wilting.  Roots in particular are better left dirty.  So I recommend washing produce just before use, and washing it well.  Organic dirt is still… well, dirty.

Agretti
agrettiDescription: Also called saltwort. A succulent plant, slightly salty and tangy, it is native to coastal areas. The leaves and tender stems are edible raw or cooked.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Fancy addition to salads, great raw tossed with tomatoes and cheese, chopped into a raw or cooked tapenade for fish
Recipes:

 

Amaranth
amaranthDescription: The next super food – high in lots of good things and historically eaten by many cultures around the world. We see the seeds/grains in the grocery, but the farm only grows the leafy versions of this vegetable.
How to Store: Not terribly tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for a couple weeks this way.
General Suggestions: Use where you’d use spinach – salads (with other greens), stir fries
Recipes10-minute soup

Apple
Varieties: wealthy, winesap, red delicious, golden delicous
Description: Apples is apples. The farm grows several varieties, each coming ripe at different times.
How to Store: Stores best in the fridge, but can handle the countertop. Don’t store with other fruit or veg. Some varieties store better than others – these are heirlooms and not as indestructible as grocery store fruit. Since we don’t use chemicals, your fruit may have been sampled by six-legged food tester. Cut around them – most of the fruit is still fine.
General Suggestions: Since they’re not guaranteed worm-free, I tend to cut up farm apples. They’re all great raw, but I also toss them into sautés with cabbage, kohlrabi, or turnips.
RecipesKohlrabi and Apple Saute

Apricots
ApricotDescription: Stone fruit relative of peaches. Not as sweet, not as juicy, holds up to cooking.
How to Store: If hard, ripen on the countertop in a paper bag. Eat immediately if ripe. Stone and freeze if over ripe. Some varieties store better than others – these are heirlooms and not as indestructible as grocery store fruit. Since we don’t use chemicals, your fruit may have been sampled by six-legged food tester. Cut around them – most of the fruit is still fine.
General Suggestions: Apricots don’t make it past the snacking stage at my house, but they make a great alternative to peaches in desserts. Try adding them to curries or as a sort of chutney side for roasted meats.
RecipesFreezer jam
Apricots and mascarpone

Artichokes
artichokesDescription: A giant, edible thistle. The middle of the flower is the tender part.
How to Store: Best at peak freshness. Can keep in the fridge. Or core, quarter, blanch, and freeze.
HERE IS A GREAT LINK ON USING ARTICHOKES (Mark Bittman, NYTimes)
General Suggestions: Generally served as a side by themselves (steamed or roasted). The hearts are good on pizza or pasta.
Recipes:

 

Arugula
arugulaDescription: A bitter spring green, with long lobed leaves. Can be eaten raw when young, cooked or wilted when older.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Salads by themselves with strong toppings or mixed with other greens; as a bed for meats or other dishes (think ladling stroganoff over greens instead of noodles); wilted in the skillet and served with a splash of vinegar
RecipesPesto

Asparagus
asparagusVarieties: green, purple, or white
Description: The long, thin flower stalk of a perennial plant. Asparagus (ditch weed) grows most in the spring.
How to Store: Best immediately. If you need to store for more than a day, put spears upright in water in the fridge (use a bowl or large glass). They’ll keep for a week or more this way.
General Suggestions: Steam or blanch and serve simple (with lemon and parmesan?), add to stir fries or pasta dishes, roasted is nice as well
Recipes:

Basil
basilVarieties: Genovese (standard) and Thai
Description: A common herb in Italian and Asian cooking, basil has a strong, fresh, spicy flavor.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Pesto, added to stir fries or simple pasta, made into salad with tomatoes and cheese
RecipesPesto
Thai Basil Pesto

Beets
beets2Varieties: red, candystripe, Chioggia, golden
Description: Generally very red root vegetable, high in sugar, edible greens. The redder roots stain everything, but paler roots not so much.
How to Store: Cut the tops off (they’re edible). Put in a plastic bag and drop in the crisper. As long as they don’t mold, they’ll stay good for months.
General Suggestions: Roasted is most common. Shredded into salads, or as the main ingredient in a slaw-type salad.
RecipesBorscht

Bitter melon
bittermelonDescription: An Asian vegetable with “tonic” qualities. It looks like a very ridgey cucumber. This lives up to its name… very bitter.
How to Store: Keeps a couple days on the countertop, and about a week in the fridge (nothing special).
General Suggestions: It is generally stir-fried in East Asian cuisine, or added to curries in South Asian. Cutting it up, salting it, then rinsing off the salt after 15-30 minutes cuts the bitterness. Try sautéing it a bit then scrambling eggs into it.
Recipesa post of collected Bitter Melon info

Blackberries
blackberriesDescription: Generally firm, dark, and juicy.
How to Store: Eat now! Or keep in the fridge in the container for a couple days. It will start to mold quickly if some of them are riper than others.
General Suggestions: These never make it past snack stage at my house, but they’re great in salads, on or in desserts, and on breakfast baked goods.
Recipes:

 

Broccoli
broccoliVarieties: green, broccolini, Chinese broccoli
Description: We have several types of broccoli, some with the big dense heads common in the grocery, others with subtler flower stalks and leaves. Especially with the leafier variety, all of it is edible.
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: Steamed, boiled, stir-fried
Recipes:

 

Broccoli raab
broccolirabeVarieties: rape, rapini
Description: A leafy green related to broccoli. The flowers look a lot like little broccolis. Spicier. All of it is edible, but the stalks can get a little tough.
How to Store: Not terribly tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for a couple weeks this way.
General Suggestions: Fantastic quickly stir-fried with garlic and lots of olive oil then tossed with pasta (rustic Italian classic)
RecipesGarlicky pasta with greens

Brussels sprouts
brusselsproutsDescription: Little cabbages that grow on stalks. Sweeter than cabbage, but more pungent.
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: I prefer mine roasted (with bacon and onions, and sometimes potatoes). They’re also good steamed.
Recipes:

 

Cabbage
Varieties: green, red, napa
Description: Cruciferous, leafy green. Super hardy, very common, many varieties. Tighter leaves keep better.
How to Store: Wrap in plastic or plan to take off the outer leaves when it fits the menu. Can keep for weeks. More tender varieties should be wrapped in plastic.
General Suggestions: slaw/salad (especially the tender varieties), stir-fries, light soups.
RecipesCabbage soup
Borscht
Cabbage three ways

Carrots
carrotsVarieties: several different colors
Description: Root vegetable, mostly orange. Some are purple!
How to Store: Leave them dirty. If there’s tops, cut them off and eat them now. They will keep many weeks in the fridge if checked every few days.
General Suggestions: Tops are great in salads, soups, or stir fries. I’ve seen them tempura battered and deep fried – super tasty. The roots are familiar to all of us.
Recipes: Buttered spiced carrots

 

Cherries
peaches, cherries, apricotsDescription: Early season, tender, stone fruit.
How to Store: Eat now! Or keep in the fridge in the container for a couple days. It will start to mold quickly if a couple are over-ripe or bruised.
General Suggestions: Pit them before cooking them.  They add a little zing to pilafs and bread puddings.
Recipes:

 

 

Chives
Varieties: garlic, onion, shallot
Description: Leafy greens of onions, shallots, or garlic. Very short season.
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: If there’s enough, a strong pesto can be made. Otherwise, add to anything as you would garlic or onions.
Recipes:

Choys
bokchoy-babyVarieties: bok choy, yu choi, baby varieties
Description: East Asian varieties of cabbage. A little more tender, a little flatter leaf. Generally a little spicier than cabbage.
How to Store: Not terribly tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for a couple weeks this way, possibly several.
General Suggestions: Use as cabbage above, but reduce the cooking time. The baby varieties are a dinner party side when braised in stock and served whole or halfed.
Recipes:

Collards
collardsDescription: Very hardy green. Common in southern cooking. Stronger “green” flavor and smell than turnip greens, but sweeter.
How to Store: Hardy greens. Wrapped loosely in plastic, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: sliced and sautéed with garlic, oil, and maybe a little stock (easiest and fastest way to get rid of a lot); boiled to softness with a ham or black-eyed peas; the strong flavor complements strong seasonings like red peppers, vinegar, or curry
RecipesGarlicky pasta with greens

Corn
cornDescription: Corn. Big flowery tasty grass.
How to Store: Best immediately. Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: Boil or grill. Or slice the kernels off the raw cob and use like canned/frozen corn – it makes a mess, but rarely occurs to us when we’re looking at a whole cob.
Recipes:

 

Cucumber
Varieties: standard, Asian, lemon, Armenian, brown, poona kheera
Description: Relative to melons, gives some people indigestion (Armenian varieties won’t do that).
How to Store: Refrigerate. The crisper helps, but try to eat early. Some varieties keep longer than others.
General Suggestions: salads, simply cut up, a cold soup, or quick pickles (salt, let sit for an hour or more, rinse)
Recipes:

Eggplant
eggplantVarieties: black beauty, white, asian, raspberry
Description: Nightshade, relative of tomatoes and potatoes. Purple skin. Thicker the skin, the better it keeps.  Also, generally, the thicker the skin, the more likely it is to be a little bitter.
How to Store: Keep on the countertop for a day or two, in the fridge for a day or two more.
General Suggestions: Larger eggplants can be a little bitter. After cutting them up for your recipe, try salting them and letting them rest. Blot with a paper towel to remove excess moisture and salt. Roasted, they blend into a dip like baba ghanoush. Smaller Asian varieties are tasty quickly sautéed. Larger Italian varieties lend themselves to eggplant parmesan or layering into lasagna.
RecipesSimple Thai curry

Endive
frisee1Varieties: escarole, frisee, chicory
Description: A curly-leaved, fancy salad (or cooking) green from Europe. A little bitter, a lot expensive.
How to Store: Not terribly tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for a couple weeks this way.
General Suggestions: Not as bitter as some salad greens, so doesn’t have to be mixed with other greens. Also holds up well to quick sautéing or wilting with hot toppings.
Recipes:

Fava beans
Description: Large beans in large green pods. Look a lot like long edamame. An old food common to North Africa and South Asia.
How to Store: Best immediately. Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge. They’re harvested young and wet, so watch for mold!
General Suggestions: They have to be removed from the pod, boiled briefly (causes the shells to pop off), then you can continue cooking them. These are one of the more energy intensive and exotic ingredients grown on the farm. They can be ground up and used for falafel (instead of chickpeas), made into a paste and served with endive (see above), or served simply boiled with some butter and herbs.
Recipes:

flowers
Week1dVarieties: viola/pansy mostly
Description: They’re pretty AND they’re tasty. Win-win. Flowers are generally either sweet or peppery.
How to Store: Keep in the container. Refrigerate. Eat very quickly.
General Suggestions: Wonderful garnishes for salad or plates.
Recipes:

 

 

Garlic
Description: One of the most ubiquitous and useful of the spices. The familiar bulbs break into cloves.
How to Store: Store dry, cool, and dark. Young varieties (small bulbs that look like overgrown green onions) are best eaten fresh and don’t require as much peeling.
General Suggestions: Pesto is the best way to use large amounts of garlic. Or take a whole head of garlic and roast it in the oven for over an hour – you’ll end up with little packets of tasty for spreading on bread.
Recipes:

Goji berry greens
Description: Goji berries are commonly seen in health food stores, but these are just the stems and leaves of the woody plant.
How to Store: Not terribly tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for a couple weeks this way.
General Suggestions: Add to salads, stir-fries, or soups. They’re mostly a healthy addition to anything you’re making. Being a health food, smoothies seem to be a popular use.
Recipes:

Green beans
Varieties: normal, long beans, Chinese green beans
Description: Immature bean pods, entirely edible.
How to Store: Best just after picking. Will keep up to a week in plastic in the fridge as long as they aren’t molding.
General Suggestions: Boiled, steamed, veggie soup, stir fry. They’ll all be squeaky fresh compared to canned or frozen green beans. Quickly sauté with sliced almonds and sesame oil.
Recipes:

Honey
honeyDescription: Comes straight from David’s bee hives.
How to Store: In the cupboard. If it crystalizes, microwave it at 30s bursts until soft.
General Suggestions: Great for cooking or in hot tea, it also eases coughs if taken by the spoonful.
Recipes:

 

 

Kale
Varieties: blue, red Russian, wild garden, lacinato/dinosaur, Chinese
Description: Sturdy, cold weather greens related to cabbage and broccoli. Baby and Lacinato varieties are tender enough for salads, while the tougher versions need cooking.
How to Store: Hardy greens. Wrapped loosely in plastic, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: Salads. Sauteed with garlic and oil. Added to potato soup. Boiled as a side.
RecipesKale chips

Kohlrabi
kohlrabi3Description: A bulbous vegetable whose name means “cabbage turnip”. The leaves are edible, but don’t always come with the sputnik-shaped bulb.
How to Store: Cut the tops off (they’re edible). Put in a plastic bag and drop in the crisper. As long as they don’t mold, they’ll stay good for months.
General Suggestions: Peel them first.  Add to roasted roots. Saute with apples. Makes a decent soup. Small ones are tasty match-sticked as a salad topping or mixed with beets or carrots in a sort of slaw.
Recipes: Ragout of summer veggies
Kohlrabi and Squash Empanadas

Lettuce
Varieties: buttercrunch, Chinese butter, deer tongue, great lake, iceberg, red romaine, red sail, romaine, corn salad
Description: Salad greens. They come in all manner of color, size, and sweetness.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Eat them early, eat them often (as salad). If you find them bitter, try sautéing them quickly with some butter. I’ve even seen cold soups that involve lettuce as a primary ingredient.
Recipes:

Melons
Varieties: cantaloupe, watermelon
Description: Round and sweet, melons come in a wide variety of sizes and flavors.
How to Store: On the countertop until the stem-end smells of melon. Unless you start smelling melon when you walk into your kitchen… then cut it up and eat it, storing cut pieces in the fridge.
General Suggestions: Eat fresh. Toss into cottage cheese. Make a salsa.
Recipes:

Microgreens
microgreens-2
microgreens - pea shootsVarieties: mixed, radish, basil, pea shoots
Description: Not sprouts, but baby plants. These tiny guys fetch top dollar at fancy restaurants and grocery stores. They pack a flavor wallop
How to Store: Keep in the container they came in. Refrigerate. Eat quickly.
General Suggestions: Garnish. Salad. As a topping on cheese and crackers. Blended into cream cheese. Pea shoots are great quickly sautéed with noodles.
Recipes:

Mint
Varieties: spearmint, chocolate mine
Description: Leafy herb. Comes in a wide variety of minty flavors.
How to Store: Wrap in paper towels, wrap tightly in plastic. Eat quickly.
General Suggestions: Deserts. Mixed drinks. Tea.
Recipes:

Mizuna
mizunaDescription: An attractive Japanese green. Small pointy leaves related to mustard. Can be pretty spicy. Good raw or cooked.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Toss with pasta or noodles. Add to salads. Use as a bed for grilled fish or meat. Sautee as I suggest with almost all greens. Or pickle them.
Recipes:

 

Mustard greens
mustardgreensVarieties: green, red
Description: Supremely healthy like all the cabbage relatives, this is a spicy brassica. The tenderest babies are fine raw in salads, but mostly they’ll want cooking.
How to Store: Hardy greens. Wrapped loosely in plastic, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: Sautee them quickly (they’re tenderer than kale or collards). Fry with something porky and then simmer until tender (Southern style). Also popular in Indian cuisine.
Recipes:

Nectarines
nectarineDescription: A stone fruit like an unfuzzy peach.
How to Store: If hard, ripen on the countertop in a paper bag. Eat immediately if ripe. Stone and freeze if over ripe. Some varieties store better than others – these are heirlooms and not as indestructible as grocery store fruit. Since we don’t use chemicals, your fruit may have been sampled by six-legged food tester. Cut around them – most of the fruit is still fine.
General Suggestions: Best fresh.
Recipes:

Okra
okraDescription: A mucilaginous (I love that word) seed pod, okra is common in Southern, Carribean, African, Indian, and Asian cooking. They’re pointy, about finger length, and green.
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: Okra gets gooey when you cook it. That makes it great for thickening stews and gumbos. You can avoid the gooiness by cooking them quickly, like deep frying or stir-frying. They can be roasted as well.
Recipes:

Onion
onionVarieties: red, white, yellow, walla walla
Description: Onions.
How to Store: Dry, cool, dark. If they have green tops on them, cut them off and store them in the fridge – they’re too fresh to keep for more than a week.
General Suggestions: Useful for making every other vegetable taste better, onions are also quite good roasted for a couple of hours until sweet and soft.
Recipes:

 

Oregano
Description: A relative of mint and marjoram, this herb has small leaves and a strong aroma.
How to Store: Wrap in paper towels, wrap tightly in plastic. Eat quickly.
General Suggestions: Italian and Latin American dishes
Recipes:

Parsnip
parsnipDescription: Looks like a fat white carrot. They’re sweet and nutty. The cores can go woody if the weather gets too hot, but the outsides are still good.
How to Store: In a bag in the crisper. Can last up to a month.
General Suggestions: A nice addition to roasted root veggies, alone or paired with a variety. Great in a creamy soup with nuts. Divine simmered to softness then buttered and seasoned with coriander.
Recipes:

 

Peaches
Varieties: regina, white, early, doughnut
Description: This stone fruit is always great in season, but if you’re not shipping them to a grocery store, some really great (tender) varieties become available. Some of them will arrive a little bruised, but they’ll be as peachy as peaches get. The doughnut variety are particularly delightful to kids in lunchboxes, and they aren’t as juicy so they pack well.
How to Store: If hard, ripen on the countertop in a paper bag. Eat immediately or store in the fridge if ripe. Stone and freeze if over ripe. Some varieties store better than others – these are heirlooms and not as indestructible as grocery store fruit. Since we don’t use chemicals, your fruit may have been sampled by six-legged food tester. Cut around them – most of the fruit is still fine.
General Suggestions: Eat them fresh. Put them in a skillet with butter, nutmeg, and coriander until soft, then put over ice cream. Salsa and chutney are also great when you have too many.
Recipes:

Pear
Varieties: Bartlett, red
Description: Pears.
How to Store: If hard, ripen on the countertop in a paper bag. Eat immediately if ripe. Some varieties store better than others – these are heirlooms and not as indestructible as grocery store fruit. Since we don’t use chemicals, your fruit may have been sampled by six-legged food tester. Cut around them – most of the fruit is still fine.
General Suggestions: Fresh. In a pear tart.
Recipes:

Peas, shell
Varieties: English
Description: Mature peas. They need to be shelled before you can cook and eat them. Pulling the string along one edge makes them easier to pop open. The pods aren’t edible (but you can make a nice soup stock out of them).
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: Tasty by themselves. Also great in a buttery sauce with mint over pasta – super springy.
Recipes: Ragout of summer veggies

Peas, snap
Sugarsnap peasVarieties: sugarsnap, yellow snaps
Description: Immature peas (they look a lot like mature peas), so the pods are also edible, even raw. Pull the strings and crunch away.
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: I mostly serve mine raw as snacks or sides, but you can cook them in quick stir fries or soups as well.
Recipes:

 

Peppers
Varieties: green bell, Marisol, poblano, Anaheim, gypsy, holy mole
Description: Peppers come in such a large variety of shapes and flavors. None of these varieties have too much heat, but a couple (like poblano) are a little better if their skins are burnt (in the broiler or the gas burner of your stove) and peeled off. And any pepper you do that to will freeze well for use through the winter.
How to Store: Loosely wrapped in plastic, this should keep a week in the fridge.
General Suggestions: You can use these just about anywhere. Larger peppers can be stuffed and baked. Fry them, roast them, grill them, eat them raw. While the blazing hot varieties are useful in just a few kinds of dishes (or to taste), these milder cousins are common in every quisine from South America, to Tex-Mex, to Spain, to Eastern Europe.
Recipes:

Plums/Prunes
Description: Soft, tart, sweet stone fruits. A prune is a subset of the plum family.
How to Store: If hard, ripen on the countertop in a paper bag. Eat immediately or store in the fridge if ripe. Stone and freeze if over ripe.
General Suggestions: Eat fresh or make jam. Can also be dried, salted, or pickled. We don’t tend to get large amounts of this fruit, so I don’t have as many suggestions.
Recipes:

Potatoes
potatoesVarieties: russet, Yukon, red, purple, fingerling
Description: Taters. Po-Tay-Toes
How to Store: Don’t wash. Breathable bag, room temp, dark.
General Suggestions: “Boil ‘em, Mash ‘em, Stick ‘em in a stew.” Roasted with other root vegetables, help make mashes of parsnips or rutabaga more familiar to new eaters.
RecipesDavid’s no-gravy Mashed Potatoes

 

Purslane
purslaneDescription: If you think purslane looks remarkably like the weed that grows between the sidewalk segments of your neighborhood, that’s because it IS that weed. Terribly delicate once you pick it, this succulent is remarkably nutritious – it is one of the few (and highest) vegetable sources of Omega-3 fatty acids. The leaves and tender stems are edible raw or cooked.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Eat it raw in salads (see agretti above for some tasty ideas), stir-fried, or as a thickener in soups and stews.
Recipes:

Radish
Varieties: red, black, watermelon, daikon
Description: Varying in spiciness, radishes are a surprisingly versatile root veg. We’re all used to seeing them as the small, red highlights in salads. However, the farm produces quite a bit of black (literally black skinned, fairly spicy, up to baseball sized), daikon (Japanese variety, long and white, fairly mild), and watermelon (green and white outside, pink inside, relatively sweet).
How to Store: Cut the tops off (they’re edible but typically pre-chewed-upon by bugs). Put in a plastic bag and drop in the crisper. As long as they don’t mold, they’ll stay good for months.
General Suggestions: Can be diced up and sautéed with butter, added to soup (like miso soup), made into a slaw salad with carrots, or eaten sliced with cheese (the milder varieties especially).
RecipesMiso

Raspberries

raspberriesraspberries-yellowVarieties: red, golden
Description: Little bursts of red sweetness. Very tender fruit (doesn’t ship well, especially the more “raspberry-y” varieties).
How to Store: Eat now! Or keep in the fridge in the container for a couple days. If any of them are bruised, they will start to mold quickly.
General Suggestions: Fresh. Or in pancakes.
Recipes:

Rhubarb
rhubarbDescription: It looks like a red celery, but it is the stalk of a large leafy plant. The stalks are sour/tart, which is a surprise since we usually associate rhubarb with strawberry pie.
How to Store: In a plastic bag, watching for mold, it will keep for several weeks in the fridge.
General Suggestions: You can grill the stalks as a side dish. Stew them with sugar to make desserts like pies or crumbles, or stew them further to make an applesauce type dish. Rhubarb is also tasty in dishes like curries.
RecipesLentil and Rhubarb curry

Rutabaga
rutabagaDescription: Sometimes called a swede, a yellow turnip, and mostly amusingly – a neep (Scotland). These are large, sweet relatives of turnips, with purple tops and white bottoms. Interestingly, before the rise of pumpkins, carved rutabaga were the original jack-o-lanterns.
How to Store: In a plastic bag, watching for mold, it will keep for several weeks in the fridge.
General Suggestions: Roast, bake, or add to soups. Or mash with potatoes (tatties and neeps). Can be sliced thin and eaten raw with cheese and meat.
Recipes:

Scapes
scapesVarieties: onion, shallot, garlic
Description: Flower stalks of the allium family, these are long, thin, and bright green. The pointy flower cone on the top isn’t edible, and the very bottom can be a bit woody, but the middle is a milder version of the parent plant (onion or garlic).
How to Store: In a plastic bag, it will keep for a couple weeks in the fridge. Or slice up and freeze for later use.
General Suggestions: If there’s enough, a strong pesto can be made. Otherwise, chop up and add to anything as you would garlic or onions. Make a nice side dish / relish for pork if chopped and sautéed.
Recipes:

Shallot
shallotDescription: A small, two lobed version of the onion. The flavor isn’t as strong, so they’re called for in subtler dishes.
How to Store: Dry, cool, dark. Doesn’t store as long as an onion, so eat within a week or three.
General Suggestions: Use anywhere you’d use an onion, especially in salads or dressings where it is eaten raw.
Recipes:

 

Shungiku
ShungikuDescription: Chrysanthemum greens. These are mostly eaten in Asian cuisine, lightly cooked.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Quickly braised or stir-fried, wilted with a simple dressing, or added to soups.
RecipesMiso
Several ideas for chrysanthemum greens

 

Sorrel
sorrelDescription: Sometimes called “lemon spinach” because it looks like spinach but has a bright, sour taste.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Use in soups, salads, or sauces. Salads are nice with strong ingredients (salty cheese, olives, tomatoes). It is popular with mashed potatoes in northern Europe and with curried lentils in India.
RecipesPesto
Sorrel and Green Garlic Pesto
Simple Sharp Salad
Creamy greens soup

Spinach
spinachDescription: I’m strong to the finish cuz I eats my spinach.
How to Store: Tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for about a week this way.
General Suggestions: Raw, blanched, boiled. Salads, quickly sautéed, added to soups.
Recipes: Creamy greens soup
Go-To Greens with Sesame Sauce

 

Spring or young (onion family)
young - garlicVarieties: leeks, onions, garlic
Description: The young versions of onions and garlic are just like the ripe versions, just smaller and more tender.
How to Store: Hardy greens. Wrapped loosely in plastic, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: Use as you would full grown or green versions.
Recipes:

 

Sprouts
microgreens - pea shootsVarieties: pea, bean
Description: Sprouts, with their earthy flavor and stringy looks, are pretty common sights. They should be washed before use.
How to Store: Keep in the container they come in. Eat fresh the first day, cook after that.
General Suggestions: Add to stir fries and noodle dishes.
Recipes:

 

Strawberries
strawberriesDescription: Sweet red berries. Wash before eating (they grow on the ground).
How to Store: Eat now! Or keep in the fridge in the container for a couple days. It will start to mold quickly – these haven’t been “sanitized” like commercial strawberries, and they’re a tender variety.
General Suggestions: We don’t get tons, and mine never make it into the fridge.
Recipes:

 

Summer squash, tender
Varieties: babies, crookneck, Italian striped, Italian zucchini, Mediterranean, straight neck, yellow, zephyr, zucchini
Description: Yellow or green, long and skinny. Summer squash are some of the most prolific summer vegetables. These are the more tender varieties that don’t need peeling.
How to Store: On the counter if you’ll eat them in a week, in the fridge if you’ll hold onto them longer. You can also chop them up and freeze them – they’ll keep well enough for soups, casseroles, and stir-fries.
General Suggestions: Grill, roast, sauté, stir-fry, pickle. Add to soups, pasta dishes, or breads. Can be eaten raw on salads if they’re young and tender.
Recipes: Kohlrabi and Squash Empanadas
Marinated Garden Vegetables

Summer squash, thick
Varieties: finger, flying saucer, sunburst, pattypan, young spaghetti
Description: Thicker skinned than the tender varieties, these are usually more oddball in shape. Some of them are scalloped, some are round. If they’re young enough, the skins are completely edible if they’re cooked a little longer. Older varieties will need to be peeled, or roasted so the shells can act like bowls.
How to Store: On the countertop for a week or so, in the fridge another week. Slice, blanch, and freeze if you’re being overwhelmed.
General Suggestions: Sautee, stir-fry, soup, ratatouille, minestrone.
RecipesStuffed zucchini

Sunchokes
sunchokeDescription: The starchy root of a sunflower relative, sunchokes are sometimes called Jerusalem artichokes. Think of them as a nutty, crunchy potato. They are quite healthy, especially for the insulin resistant. Can give some folks a rumbly belly.
How to Store: Leave them dirty. They will keep many weeks in the fridge if checked every couple days.
General Suggestions: Roast them with other roots. Or make a sunchoke gratin. They’re also quite tasty as a soup base.
RecipesSkillet sunchokes
Sunchoke gratin

Swiss chard
Varieties: white, red, rainbow
Description: The leafy green of a beet plant that doesn’t make beets. Big, flavorful, non-bitter leaves. Like a spinach that holds up really well to cooking. All of it is edible, but the stems need a bit more cooking than the green parts.
How to Store: Hardy greens. Wrapped loosely in plastic, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: The young ones can be eaten as salad; older greens can be made into salad too, if salted and oiled and allowed to rest a bit before serving. Sautee with garlic, olive oil, and pine nuts. Add to gratins. Cut into ribbons and replace as noodles under stroganoff. Make a super-easy lunch at work by microwaving a handful for 30s or so, then topping with grilled meat.
Recipes: Sunflower chard braise

Tomatoes
Varieties: cherry, old german, roma, san marzano
Description: These are mostly heirloom varieties of tomatoes, and certainly not those overly firm kinds that ship so well to the grocery store.
How to Store: On the countertop. NEVER refrigerate a tomato.
General Suggestions: There’s a hundred and one ways to use a tomato. Toss cherries into the skillet after some basil and garlic, they’ll pop a bit, and you can toss them with pasta. San Marzanos are the classic Italian paste tomato – they make fantastic sauce. Curries. Tomato tarts (really – try something sweet made out of tomatoes).
Recipes:

Turnip greens
turnip greens 2Description: Not listed in most folk’s foody ambitions (there are a handful of vegetables that have a reputation after getting a lot of families through dark ages, depressions, wars, and the settling of hardscrabble land), turnip greens have a strong flavor and a lot of nutrition. They’re a little bitter, but vinegar, lemon juice, strong spices, or long cooking will cut that quite a bit.
How to Store: Hardy greens. Wrapped loosely in plastic, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: I have a go-to method with greens – sautee with oil, garlic, salt, and a finishing splash of vinegar. See mustard and collard greens for other, more traditional ideas.
Recipes:

Turnips
turnip_youngDescription: See turnip greens for the thoughts on vegetables with bad reputations. Turnips can be sweet, mild, tasty, and plentiful.
How to Store: Cut the tops off (they’re edible). Put in a plastic bag and drop in the crisper. As long as they don’t mold, they’ll stay good for months.
General Suggestions: Try sautéed with butter and spices. Or sliced with a good aged cheddar. Added to mashes and roasted roots.
Recipes: Ragout of summer veggies

 

Watercress
Description: Peppery little green related to mustard.
How to Store: Not terribly tender. Wrap in loosely in paper towel, wrap loosely in plastic, put in the crisper. Will store for a couple weeks this way.
General Suggestions: Great in salads and soups, and thrown on sandwiches.
Recipes:

Wheat grass
wheatgrassDescription: Wheat grass is the young (grassy) version of wheat. It is one of the go-to health foods of the last several decades.
How to Store: Hardy greens. In their plastic container, they’ll keep two weeks without effort.
General Suggestions: It needs to be juiced to become digestible. Blending and running through a strainer gets very close. Blend with apple juice and ginger to make it tasty.
Recipes:

 

Winter squash
Varieties: banana, hubbard, New York cheese
Description: Winter squash are like pumpkins, but tasty. They have thick skins and store well through the winter. The skins aren’t edible (except for kabocha), but their seeds can be roasted and their flesh is sweet.
How to Store: Cool. Dark. Don’t let it mold or go soft. As long as the hull is intact, it is good.
General Suggestions: Half them, scoop out the seeds, and roast until tender…. Now you’re ready for most recipes. Soups, casseroles, and roasted root mixes are all good home for winter squash. You can also slice them relatively thin, season with soy sauce, sesame oil, and sesame seeds, then roast until browned.
RecipesArabian squash-cheese casserole
Gypsy Soup

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